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If you worked in any of these countries, you could be due a Tax Refund

2009 Income Tax Rates in Australia

As the end of the Australian tax year draws near, you may want to look at the 2009 tax rates (also known as tax brackets, or tax tables) to make sure you paid the right amount of tax.

Residents for tax purposes:

  • A$ 1 - A$ 6,000 --  tax free
  • A$ 6,001 - A$ 34,000 -- 15% on the surplus over 6,000
  • A$ 34,001 - A$ 80,000 -- A$ 3,600 plus 30% on the surplus over 34,000
  • A$ 80,001 - A$ 180,000 -- A$ 17,100 plus 40% on the surplus over 80,000
  • A$ 180,001 and over -- 47,100 plus 45% on the surplus over 180,000

Here is how it works: If you earned 47K in the 2009 tax year, the amount of tax you owe (not including eligible deductions) is A$ 3,600 + (30% of 13,000) = A$ 7,500. If you paid more than that, you may be due a tax refund.

Non-Residents for tax purposes:

  • A$ 1 - A$ 34,000 -- 29%
  • A$ 34,001 - A$ 80,000 -- A$ 9,860 plus 30% on the surplus over 34,000
  • A$ 80,001 - A$ 180,000 -- A$ 23,660 plus 40% on the surplus over 80,000
  • A$ 180,000 and above -- A$ 63,660 plus 45% on the surplus over 180,000

2009 Income Tax Rates in AustraliaYou may have noticed that non-residents for tax purposes a) are taxed at much higher rates and b) are given no tax-free allowance. Most working holiday makers (backpackers) are taxed at the non-resident rate of 29%, however a backpacker may qualify for a resident for tax purposes and be eligible for the more favorable resident rates, and receive a substantial tax refund.

If you worked in Australia on a working holiday visa, student visa, or any other temporary resident visa, it's a good idea to lodge your Australia tax return with Taxback.com to ensure tax compliance and maximum tax refund. If you are leaving Australia permanently, you can also reclaim your superannuation.